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Building a culture of command

In any organization, the ability to command and lead is essential for success. But creating a culture of commanders within an organization can be difficult, especially if the company is large and decentralized. A strong command culture starts at the top, with a clear and concise vision from the CEO and leadership team. From there, it must be communicated effectively to all company members, down to the lowest levels. Everyone will be working towards the same goals and achieving great things.

What is a culture of command?

A culture of command is a term used to describe an organization where everyone is clear on their role and responsibilities and is working together towards a common goal. It’s essential to ensure that everyone in the company is on the same page and aligned with its vision.

A strong command culture starts at the top, with a clear and concise vision from the CEO and leadership team. This vision must be communicated to all employees, and everyone must buy into it. Leadership must lead by example and be held accountable for their actions. Being held responsible sets a clear example to the organization of what behaviors will or will not be tolerated. Leaders cannot allow the “do as I say, not as I do” mentality to infiltrate the organization.

When everyone in the organization is working towards the same goal, it creates a sense of unity and purpose. This can be a powerful motivating force for employees. It can also help create a more positive work environment, as employees feel like they are part of something larger than themselves.

Build the Culture of Command

A culture of command takes time to develop, but it is essential for any organization that wants to succeed. Leadership must be committed to building this culture from the ground up and setting the tone for the organization. With a strong vision and leadership team in place, an organization can begin to build a culture of command that will help them achieve its goals.

Let Go.

The first step in building a culture of command is letting go. The C-level executives must be able to let go of control. There are numerous layers of organizational hierarchy in place for a reason. Use it to your advantage. Businesses fail when decision-making ability is removed from mid-level management teams. The executives at the top need to trust their employees to make the right decisions.

Empower your employees by giving them the ability to make decisions. Allow for creativity and risk-taking. Encourage out-of-the-box thinking. You will breed a culture of leaders who are not afraid to take risks and innovate when you do this.

Communicate

The second phase of building a culture of command begins with communication. Leadership teams cannot work in silos. Each section of an organization must be aware of what other sections are working on. Daily meetings of team leaders may seem mundane. However, the insight and experience gained by the collective group are invaluable.

During these meetings, everyone must be allowed to share their ideas openly. Leadership must be willing to listen to new and different perspectives. By embracing change and encouraging creativity, an organization can foster a culture of innovation. This is essential for any organization that wants to stay ahead of the curve.

Encouraging creativity does not mean that leadership should allow chaos to reign. There must still be structure and order within the organization. However, by being open to new ideas and ways of doing things, an organization can tap into a wealth of knowledge and experience that they may not have had access to before.

Realize the Potential

Allowing employees to own their work can have a number of benefits for an organization. When employees feel like they are part of the team and that their input is valued, they are more likely to be productive and take pride in their work.

Giving employees ownership also allows them to take risks and be creative. This can lead to new and innovative ideas that can help the organization move forward. When employees feel like they are a part of the decision-making process, they are more likely to be invested in the outcome.

Finally, allowing employees to own their work helps to create a sense of community and teamwork. When everyone feels like they are working together towards a common goal, it can help to improve morale and foster a positive work environment.

Are we on the same page?

The impact of vision cannot be understated. When we communicate to our entire workforce the vision of the organization, we keep everyone in tune with the expectations of progress. A vision should be laid out to where you see the organization in the long term. Not specifically how to get there, but the clear direction of what the outcome should be.

If you’re building a house, the elements that you want in the house should be included in the vision—the number of rooms, rough layout, size, pool, etcetera. Let the management teams, now commanders, decide how to get there. Allow creativity to foster in the environment. Continue to communicate your vision for the organization. Keep everyone locked on the outcome and push the organization forward.

Conclusion

An organization cannot achieve success without a strong leadership team in place. This is especially true when it comes to creating and fostering a culture of innovation. In order for an organization to move forward, the executives at the top must be able to let go of control and trust their employees to make the right decisions. Communication is key, and leaders must be willing to listen to new perspectives in order to foster creativity within the workforce. Allowing employees to own their work helps create a sense of community and teamwork, which can improve morale and productivity. By realizing the potential that a culture of commanders can have, an organization can tap into a wealth of knowledge and experience that they may not have had access to before.

On Evaluating Progress

In ancient Greek philosophy, Plato’s Allegory of the Cave is a story that describes people who are chained inside a cave and can only see shadows cast on the wall. The shadows represent what they perceive as reality. These people tell each other that these shadows are real things. They believe in them more than anything else. Those outside of the cave, who have seen reality with their own eyes, know better and try to convince those chained inside to come out into the light and see how wrong they are about what is true and what isn’t. But this doesn’t work because those inside don’t want to leave their comfortable place where they feel secure. After all, “they know” everything there is to know while believing nothing could be better than what they have.

The problem with this story is that it’s not just a story. It’s an allegory for the human condition. We are all like the people in the cave, perceiving shadows on the wall and believing them to be reality. And, just like the people in the cave, we don’t want to leave our comfort zone because we’re afraid of what we might find out.

What is real?

The only way to break out of this cycle is to challenge our beliefs and ideas about what is real and what isn’t. We need to be willing to question everything we think we know and be open to the possibility that we could be wrong. Only then can we start to see reality for what it is.

We can question what we think we know by examining our proclamations and asking ourselves if they stand up to scrutiny. If you think back to five years ago, there is a chance that the thoughts and beliefs you held then are no longer valid. You have progressed.

We see this routinely when we think back to our twenties or even teen years. We say things like, “I wish I would have known then what I know now.” We are not the same people we were then. We have a different perspective now.

We change as we experience more of life. Our perspectives change as we learn new information and grow in our understanding. This is progress.

It can be difficult to evaluate our progress because it’s not always easy to see how far we’ve come. We may not realize how much we’ve changed until we look back on our old beliefs and ideas and see how different they are from our current ones. But it’s important to try to do this to see just how much progress we’ve made and how much further we still have to go.

We have a habit as a species of evaluating ourselves from where we think we should be. When we think in this manner, we are thinking from the end backward. Memento Mori, which means “remember you will die” in Latin, is a way of thinking that can help us remember our mortality and appreciate the time we have been given.

It allows us to see that each day is a gift and not a right. It’s a reminder that our time is limited, and we need to make the most of it. It helps us focus on what’s important and not get caught up in things that don’t matter.

Most importantly, in the context of evaluating our progress, it eliminates us from thinking about how much further we have to go. While reading this, you could die from an aneurism where you think your endpoint should suddenly become irrelevant.

Instead, evaluate yourself on how far you have come. Not compared to anyone else. Not compared to where you think you should be. But, actual evidence is proof of the gap between where you started and where you are now.

This is progress. And, it’s the only thing that matters.

If you feel stuck or like you’re not making the progress you want to be, take a step back and look at how far you’ve come. You’ll be surprised by just how much progress you have made. And once you see it, you can use it as motivation to keep going.

On Favorite Days and Challenges

I’m sure many things made up your favorite day from the past week, but I’ll bet one of them was an activity that stuck out above the rest. Think about what activities come to mind when thinking back on a great time in the past week.

Your favorite activity from the past week was probably something that challenged you and made you feel good. Maybe you rode your bike for the first time in years or cooked a complicated recipe from scratch. Whatever it was, it gave you a sense of accomplishment and made you feel good about yourself. And that’s precisely what we need to do more to improve ourselves.

We need to be challenged.

Too often, we get stuck In the game of complacency. We sit around waiting for things to happen to us rather than actively pursuing the life we want to live. We become content with just getting by, and our days start to blur together into one big, indistinguishable mass. But if we’re going to live our best lives truly, we need to find ways to regularly push ourselves out of our comfort zones.

Of course, this doesn’t mean that we need to put ourselves in danger or do something that makes us unhappy. But it does mean that we should challenge ourselves intellectually, physically, and emotionally on a regular basis. By doing so, we keep ourselves sharp and prevent ourselves from becoming stagnant.

As Marcus Aurelius pointed out, “The object of life is not to be on the side of the majority but to escape finding oneself in the ranks of the insane.” In other words, it’s far better to challenge ourselves and fail than it is to play it safe and never truly experience life.

When was the last time you felt happy?

Ask yourself an honest question. When was the last time you felt happy?

Chances are, it was during some period of growth. The combination of humility and eagerness to learn allowed you to accomplish something great, and in the process, you found joy.

Humility is needed to acknowledge we are still a work in progress. Eagerness to learn is needed to improve upon our position continually. The key is not to dwell or obsess about becoming happy. Arthur Schopenhauer said it best:

“The two enemies of human happiness are pain and boredom.”

Focus on the process, not the result.

The problem with constantly seeking out new challenges is that we can become so focused on the outcome that we forget to enjoy the journey. We get so caught up in our destination that we forget to appreciate the view along the way. We become fixated on summiting the mountain instead of enjoying the climb.

It’s important to remember that life is a journey, not a destination. The goal is to enjoy the ride, not just arrive at the finish line. Unfortunately, this is easier said than done. Our natural tendency is to focus on what lies ahead, which can often lead to anxiety and stress.

It’s not about winning or losing.

In our culture, we tend to see life as a competition. We’re constantly comparing ourselves to others and striving to be the best. We keep score of our successes and failures, and we define ourselves by our victories and defeats.

But what if we stopped seeing life as a competition? What if we stopped trying to win or lose and just focused on enjoying the game? Would we be happier? Would we be less stressed? I think the answer is yes.

Growth is not a straight line. It’s full of zig-zags and starts and stops. But if we want to experience true happiness, we need to be okay with embracing the chaos.

The Problem With Unsolicited Advice

There’s a phrase in the English language that many people have come to despise. It’s known as “unsolicited advice.” You know what I’m talking about, right? When someone tells you something they think is important for you to know, but it isn’t asked for and can be challenging to hear. It often feels like an attack on who we are and how we live our lives.

This type of advice is most commonly given by well-meaning friends or family members who think they know what’s best for us. They see us struggling with something and want to help, but their help isn’t always welcome. It can often make things worse.

So, why do people give unsolicited advice? There are a few reasons. First, they may not be aware that their advice isn’t welcome. They may genuinely believe they’re helping and that you’ll be grateful for their input. Second, they may have your best interests at heart but don’t know how to express it in a helpful way. And third, they may be trying to control the situation or the outcome. Regardless of the reason, unsolicited advice is rarely helpful and can often be harmful.

If you’re on the receiving end of unsolicited advice, you can do a few things to manage the situation. First, try to understand the intent behind the advice. It may be easier to hear if it’s coming from a place of love and concern. If it’s coming from a place of control, it may be harder to take. Second, you can express your gratitude for the person’s concern but let them know that you don’t need or want their advice. This can be difficult to do, but it’s important to be assertive. And finally, you can redirect the conversation to something else.

Let’s be real for a moment.

None of the above should apply. Right? After all, we didn’t want the advice to begin with. So, what is the big deal if we shrug it off?

The problem is, when we get unsolicited advice, it often feels like an attack. And when we feel attacked, our natural reaction is to defend ourselves. But this defense mechanism can often make the situation worse. Even more troubling, our natural defenses may make it seem like we did something incorrectly. Trust me, that is not the case here.

When we try to understand the intent behind the advice, we give the person who gave us the unsolicited advice the benefit of the doubt. We assume that they had good intentions, even if their execution was poor. This assumption can help diffuse the situation and allow us to see the advice for what it may have been intended to be: helpful.

Similarly, we are being assertive by expressing our gratitude for the concern but making it clear that we don’t want or need the advice. We are setting a boundary and making it clear that this person’s opinion will not control us. This assertiveness can help diffuse the situation and help the other person see that their advice is not welcome.

And finally, by redirecting the conversation to something else, we are taking control of the situation. We choose how to respond and what direction the conversation will go in. This can be a potent tool in managing unsolicited advice.

Giving advice:

The thing about giving advice, either solicited or unsolicited, is that it is rarely followed.

When we give advice, we offer our opinion on a situation or problem. And while our thought may be well-meaning and helpful, it is ultimately up to the person receiving the advice to decide whether or not to follow it. Just because we offer our opinion does not mean that the other person is obligated to take it.

This can be difficult to accept, especially when we are close to the person receiving the advice. We can offer our opinion and hope that they will choose to follow it. We want them to take our advice because we think it will help them, but ultimately it is their decision.

Our life experiences uniquely shape our opinions. Offering advice of any kind to someone else shows a lack of regard for what made them who they are today. Additionally, our opinions are filled with errors compared to our colleagues and friends.

If you find yourself in a position where you feel the need to give unsolicited advice, stop and consider why. Is it because you genuinely believe that your opinion is the only correct one? Or is it because you think that the other person is not capable of making their own decisions? If it’s the latter, then it’s time to have a conversation about why you think that way. Unsolicited advice is rarely helpful and can often be harmful.

When it comes to giving or receiving unsolicited advice, it’s important to remember that the other person always has the final say. Our opinion is just that- an opinion. And while our intentions may be good, it’s up to the person we’re giving the advice to whether or not they want to take it. We can diffuse potentially explosive situations and maintain healthy relationships with those around us by remembering this.

The Power of Philosophy in Leadership: Ethical Actions

What is leadership? Many people would say that it is the ability to get others to do what you want. But what if there was more to it than that? What if leadership was about using your knowledge and understanding of philosophy to help others achieve their goals? This blog post will explore the power of philosophy in leadership and discuss how leaders can benefit from its use.

Philosophy can be defined as the study of wisdom and knowledge. It is a system of thought that helps us critically think about the world around us and make better decisions. When it comes to leadership, philosophy can help leaders better understand their values and beliefs and those of their followers. It can also help leaders develop a more holistic view of leadership, which considers the needs of both the leader and the follower.

When considering the needs of followers, leaders can set themselves apart from other individuals. Leaders who use philosophy as a tool for leadership can see the big picture and make decisions based on what is best for the group, not just themselves. In addition, leaders who utilize philosophical thinking are better equipped to handle difficult situations and innovatively solve problems.

This is because philosophy encourages critical thinking and allows individuals to question their assumptions. It also helps us see things from different perspectives and find new solutions to old problems. More importantly, it is a framework for ethical decision-making. Immanuel Kant argued that moral decisions should be based on a universal law that everyone can agree upon. This is what is known as the categorical imperative.

In short, the categorical imperative is acting upon what is deemed as a duty rather than self-interest. For example, if you give a homeless person money, what is your motivation? Did you act to do an “act of kindness,” or did you act because you feel that all people must give money to those in need? If the motivation for acting was for a self-fulfilling need, then we act outside of our ethics rules. However, if we believe that all needy persons should be given money and act upon that framework, we are considered ethical.

This way of thinking can be applied to leadership to make sure that the leader is acting in the best interest of their followers. For example, are we acting on behalf of our followers to gain their trust and admiration? If so, we are acting outside of our ethical framework. However, if we make decisions based on what is best for our followers and what will help them achieve their goals, we are leading ethically.

Philosophy can be a helpful tool for leadership, but it is not the only tool available. Leaders must also be aware of their values and beliefs and those of their followers. They must also have a clear understanding of the needs of both the leader and the follower. Acting upon the benefits of our followers to make their workdays more enjoyable, with no credit taken and no accolades received, is the philosophically moral high ground of leadership.

While the above writings are the surface level of true philosophical thinking in leadership, the point should not be lost. As leaders, we must constantly be aware of our intentions. Our actions should not be taken to serve ourselves but rather to benefit those we should lead. This is the power of philosophy in leadership. It can change our mindset from a self-serving one to an other-centric one. When we act with the needs of our followers in mind, we can develop trust and respect, which are essential ingredients for successful leadership.

The 5 Pillars of Growth

There are five pillars of growth and productivity that professionals in a leadership role should focus on. These five pillars are time management, goal setting, task prioritization, stress management, and self-awareness. While there is no one right way to achieve success, following these five principles will put you on the path to achieving your goals.

Time Management

Time management is critical for leaders. Leaders need to allocate their time wisely and make the most of every day to be effective. Time management is essential for two reasons. First, it allows you to focus on your goals. You’re more likely to be successful when you have a plan and know what you need to do. Second, it helps you to use your time effectively. You’re less likely to waste time if you’re organized and know what you need to do.

There are a few time management tips that can help you to be more productive:

  • Make a list of your goals and prioritize them. This will help you focus on what is essential and prevent you from getting sidetracked.
  • Set aside time each day for planning. This will help you stay on track and ensure that you’re making progress towards your goals.
  • Break down your goals into smaller tasks. This will make them more manageable and increase your chances of success.
  • Take breaks throughout the day. This will help you avoid burnout and stay refreshed so that you can continue to be productive.

Goal Setting

Goal setting is another important pillar for growth and productivity. Having specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound goals will help you stay focused and motivated. Leaders should set clear goals and develop a plan to achieve them.

Goal setting is essential for two reasons. First, it allows you to focus on what’s important and prevents you from getting sidetracked. Second, it helps you to use your time effectively. If you have specific goals you’re working towards, you’re less likely to waste time on activities that don’t help you achieve your goals.

Task Prioritization

Task prioritization is another key to productivity. Leaders need to be able to prioritize their tasks and focus on the most important ones. This involves understanding the organization’s goals and what needs to be done to achieve them.

Task prioritization is different from time management because it’s not just about wisely allocating your time. It’s also about understanding which tasks are most important and need to be given priority.

There are a few ways to prioritize your tasks:

  • Consider the goals of the organization. What needs to be done to achieve them?
  • Understand the importance of each task. What is the impact of each task on the organization?
  • Consider the urgency of each task. What is the timeline for each task?

Stress Management

Stress management is also critical for leaders. It can be challenging to focus and be productive when you are under stress. Leaders need to find ways to manage their stress to not interfere with their work.

There are a few ways to manage stress:

  • Exercise regularly. This will help to release tension and improve your overall well-being.
  • Get enough sleep. This will help you to feel rested and refreshed so that you can handle stress more effectively.
  • Eat healthy foods. This will help to improve your energy levels and mood, making it easier to handle stress.
  • Take breaks throughout the day. This will help you avoid burnout and stay refreshed so that you can continue to be productive.

Self-Awareness

Self-awareness is the final pillar for growth and productivity. Leaders need to be aware of their strengths and weaknesses and understand how they impact their work. Having self-awareness allows you to make changes to become more effective.

There are a few ways to develop self-awareness:

  • Take personality assessments. This will help you understand your personality type and how you respond to stress.
  • Observe yourself in the workplace. This will help you understand how others perceive you and identify areas where you need to improve.
  • Talk to others about your strengths and weaknesses. This will help you get feedback and see things from a different perspective.

Following these five pillars of growth and productivity will help you succeed in your career. By focusing on time management, goal setting, task prioritization, stress management, and self-awareness, you can reach your full potential as a leader.